Tag Archives: Set in England

The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

In this tightly wound story, Lo Blacklock, a journalist who writes for a travel magazine, has just been given the assignment of a lifetime: a week on a luxury cruise with only a handful of cabins. At first, Lo’s stay is nothing but pleasant: the cabins are plush, the dinner parties are sparkling, and the guests are elegant. But as the week wears on, frigid winds whip the deck, gray skies fall, and Lo witnesses what she can only describe as a nightmare: a woman being thrown overboard. The problem? All passengers remain accounted for—and so, the ship sails on as if nothing has happened, despite Lo’s desperate attempts to convey that something (or someone) has gone terribly, terribly wrong…

With surprising twists and a setting that proves as uncomfortably claustrophobic as it is eerily beautiful, Ruth Ware offers up another intense read.

 

My review:  You know I can’t wait for this to be made into a movie (because eventually it will be.)   This book read like a very good suspense thriller movie and I enjoyed it from start to finish.

Lo was very believable to me.  In the beginning of the book, I wasn’t quite sure what the hell was going on but the author developed this story with a slow burn that eventually it was full on boil that had you turning page after page.    Her development was believable she started very weak and developed into an outright strong chic and I dug it.

This was set on a cruise and if you have been on a cruise you know, you don’t really have anywhere to go until you make land.  What if you witnessed a murder?  what then… what if there was no evidence of that murder?  Creepy as hell even more creepy cause  you HAVE NO WHERE TO FREAKING GO.

Such a great book that I highly recommend you read if you haven’t already.

A Spy’s Devotion (The Regency Spies of London, #1) by Melanie Dickerson

Summary: In England’s Regency era, manners and elegance reign in public life—but behind closed doors treason and tawdriness thrive. Nicholas Langdon is no stranger to reserved civility or bloody barbarity. After suffering a battlefield injury, the wealthy, well-connected British officer returns home to heal—and to fulfill a dying soldier’s last wish by delivering his coded diary.

At the home of the Wilherns, one of England’s most powerful families, Langdon attends a lavish ball where he meets their beautiful and intelligent ward, Julia Grey. Determined to maintain propriety, he keeps his distance—until the diary is stolen and all clues lead to Julia’s guardian. As Langdon traces an evil plot that could be the nation’s undoing, he grows ever more intrigued by the lovely young woman. And when Julia realizes that England—and the man she is falling in love with—need her help, she finds herself caught in the fray. Will the two succumb to their attraction while fighting to save their country?

My Review: I absolutely loved this book.  I was initially drawn to the book because it was set in Regency England which is a time period I am obsessed with.   (Like really obsessed with, I have watched Austenland one too many times)  So when I learned this was in fact a spy novel set during the time period it was downloaded before I could say, yes please.

Freaking Fitzwilliam Darcy

Anyway I digress.  I loved the characters especially Julia, yes she was very true to the manners expected in the Regency era but she had some grit and I loved that.  Plus her love interest?  Langdon is one that would give Mr. Darcy a fair run for his money.   hahaha see what I did there?  Anyway, the plot was fantastic, you knew what was going on and there wasn’t much of a guessing game of what would happen but it was still very exciting and quite the page turner.

Zach’s Zany Movie Reviews: KING ARTHUR LEGEND OF THE SWORD (Early Review!!! Comes out May 12th)

Imagine that the Robert Downey Jr. Sherlock Holmes movies and Zack Snyder’s 300 fucked and had a baby. That baby would be KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD.  Now depending if you liked either of those films or not is going to tell whether you like this movie or not. If you hated both of them, stay away. If you liked one of them, you might enjoy this. If you thought both were pretty cool, then you’ll think this is cool too. As for my opinion? I’m option three. I really like the first 300 and both Sherlock Holmes movies (prefer the underrated superior second film) and so I really liked this.

Granted, this is no masterpiece and this won’t win any awards, but damn it if I didn’t really enjoy myself. And all of it is probably due to director Guy Ritchie. Guy Ritchie could’ve just shot this straight, making something akin to the horrible Snow White and the Huntsman films. Those films are just journey’s that go from beginning to end with no stylistic presence, straightly told, often boring, waiting for the next action scene to happen. Well in this film, Guy Ritchie puts all that shit, throws it in a blender, adds his own ingredients, takes it out, bakes it, chops it up some more, fries it, and then serves it on a platter to his audience.

If you still don’t get it, let me give you an example. Even the fucking scenes with dialogue and explanations are editing and cut fast and furiously, with Ritchie’s stylistic taste for rapid succeeding shots and dialogue to make something that would ultimately be pointless and boring, into something light, funny, entertaining, yet dazzle your eyes with it’s complexity. We get an awesome montage at the beginning of the film showing Arthur growing up, with cool music and fast beats that any other director would shoot slow, steady, and ultimately end up as a snore fest of 10 to 15 minutes. The montage scene is about 3 minutes, frantic, and shows the audience everything they need to know while keeping them intrigued.

The actions scenes where Arthur has to go out and prove himself/do something to further his journey are insane too. Instead of giving explanations of what he must do and then do it, (which would take almost half the movies run time), he splices the explanation with Arthur already doing what he needs to do, at an energetic pace to keep the plot and run time moving instead of slowing anything down. Because this movie does not slow down, at all. It is in your face and gives audience what they deserve: a very decent, yet another retelling of the Arthur and Excalibur legend.

Remember that boring shit one with Clive Owen and Keira Knightly? Yeah, we don’t get that here. That movie was too down to earth. Here we get giant city flattening elephants, mage’s with wicked powers, 300 slo-mo sword fights and bad-assery, cool chase scenes and half way decent special effects. Any director would take forever with Arthur pulling the sword out of the stone (probably would be at the halfway mark in a movie if anyone else did it), but Ritchie gets that shit out of the way 20 minutes in. I think he even winks at the audience as Arthur is waiting in line to pull the sword, gets tired of waiting, and cuts everyone else in line just to get it over with.

And remember by earlier review for Charlie Hunnam’s The Lost City of Z and how fantastic of an actor he was in that? Well he is awesome in this too and wishes he does stuff like this more often. Jude Law is a pretty decent bad guy but I wish I got a little bit more of him in this. The supporting cast is good too even though they are limited in what they have story wise.

But yes, this is the best King Arthur adaptation since Disney’s The Sword and the Stone. No doubt in my opinionated mind. For two hours I was up in my seat, eyes glued to the screen, not expecting to get a cool frantic tale like this…was really expecting something slow and boring. But this, this is anything but boring. Guy Ritchie knows how to make an entertaining film. He knows that the audience can go to sleep at the snap of the fingers, but he knows to be right in front of you with a bullhorn the entire runtime, just to make sure you are paying attention.

A Breath of Frost (The Lovegrove Legacy, #1) by Alyxandra Harvey

Summary: In 1814, three cousins—Gretchen, Emma, and Penelope—discover their family lineage of witchcraft when a binding spell is broken, allowing their individual magical powers to manifest. Now, beyond the manicured gardens and ballrooms of Regency London, an alluring underworld available only to those with power is revealed to the cousins. By claiming their power, the three cousins have accidentally opened the gates to the underworld.

Now ghouls, hellhounds—and most terrifying of all, the spirits of dark witches known as the Greymalkin Sisters—are hunting and killing young debutante witches for their powers. And, somehow, Emma is connected to the murders…because she keeps finding the bodies.

Can the cousins seal the gates before another witch is killed…or even worse, before their new gifts are stripped away?

My Review:  Funny thing about this book, it is actually in fact one of the very first books I put on my to be read shelves on Goodreads, I have been on goodreads for almost 4 years now and I should have read it 4 years ago. This book was truly a cute book.

I am pretty obsessed with the Regency era, thank you Mr. Darcy and the fact that this was a cute fantasy book that took place in the Regency era made this book that much more awesome.

This book does not contain any asshole dudes… I mean why would it it is the Regency era???? dudes had manners. ha!  I mean the girls were not even catty mean girl bitches, they all had their quirks & worked well together.  Imagine that.  It can be done in a book!

That being said it was quite refreshing for a love interest to not in fact be an asshole. I loved that. Good guys don’t have to be assholes in order to gain your affections. The characters were strong females that made mistakes, but when they made a mistake they did what they could to correct it not cry about it. I loved this book and it was truly a great book, that if I had teenage daughters I would be forcing them to read this book.

Such a cute book and I will certainly read much more in this series and by this author, very well done!